Lies Debunked: What is the Scientology cross?

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Scientology's doublecross

Scientology's® Claims

From: publicrelations@scientology.org
Subject: What is the Scientology cross?
Date: 2000/03/06

What is the Scientology cross?

It is an eight-pointed cross representing the eight parts or dynamics of life through which each individual is striving to survive. These parts are: the urge toward existence as self, as an individual; the urge to survive through creativity, including the family unit and the rearing of children; the urge to survive through a group of individuals or as a group; the urge toward survival through all mankind and as all mankind; the urge to survive as life forms and with the help of life forms such as animals, birds, insects, fish and vegetation; the urge to survive of the physical universe, by the physical universe itself and with the help of the physical universe and each one of its component parts; the urge to survive as spiritual beings or the urge for life itself to survive; the urge toward existence as infinity. To be able to live happily with respect to each of these spheres of existence is symbolized by the Scientology cross.

As a matter of interest, the cross as a symbol predates Christianity.

Robert


And now for the truth

That was an elaborate and somewhat disjointed lie. Setting aside for the moment the fact that Scientology started out with only four "dynamics," there's the little matter of Scientology's mad messiah L. Ron Hubbard's involvement in anti-Christian sex magic -- Hubbard's involvement with the Ordo Templi Orientis (or OTO for short.) (See Bare-Faced Messiah for all of the details about Hubbard's actually history.)

Much of Scientology's anti-Christian and anti-Religion ideologies have been covered in What Christians Should Know about the Church of Scientology so we won't go into much detail here.

Scientology's crossed out cross is most likely another attempt to "restimulate" people's "Body Thetans." If you've ever wondered why Scientology's freakish advertisements on television and on some of their books have a volcano on them, that, too, is an attempt to "restimulate" people's "Body Thetans."

People new to Scientology might not know what that means. In brief, Scientology's mad messiah L. Ron Hubbard tells his followers that all religion -- and Christianity in particular -- are "implants" -- little movies shown to people when they're dead specifically designed to give people false notions and thus keep them enslaved forever. Invisible murdered aliens from outer space Hubbard called "Body Thetans" get these implants and they infest humans and cause all of humanity's problems.

Scientology's volcanoes are intended to "restimulate" those "Body Thetans" which were murdered by having been frozen, transported to Earth, chained to volcanoes, and then blown to pieces using fusion bombs. Scientology's crossed out Christian cross seems to be another attempt to "restimulate" those "BTs" as they're called. Presumably Scientology's leaders think that by "restimulating" people's "BTs" using images of volcanoes and crossed out Christian crosses, they'll get those people to come to Scientology's business offices to sign up for courses to engage in "auditing" to scrape those dead aliens off of them.

If you think all that sounds nuts and might be thinking I'm making some kind of sick joke, I'm not. Visit Xenu.NET and you can read L. Ron Hubbard's bizarre claims in his own hand writing for yourself.

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