Lies Debunked: Respect the religious beliefs of others

---

Scientology's doublecross

Scientology's® Claims

From: Public Relations (publicrelations@scientology.org)
Subject: Respect the religious beliefs of others
Date: 1998/09/23

RESPECT THE RELIGIOUS BELIEFS OF OTHERS -

This is one of the many Way to Happiness precepts which is to "Respect the religious beliefs of others" as written by L. Ron Hubbard:

Tolerance is a good cornerstone on which to build human relationships. When one views the slaughter and suffering caused by religious intolerance throughout all the history of man and into modern times, one can see that intolerance is a very nonsurvival activity.

Religious tolerance does not mean one cannot express his own beliefs. It does not mean that seeking to undermine or attack the religious beliefs of another has always been a short road to trouble.

Philosophers since the time of ancient Greece have disputed with one another about the nature of God, man and the universe. The opinions of authorities ebb and flow. Just now the philosophies of "mechanism" and "materialism" - dating as far back as Egypt and Greece - are the fad: they seek to assert that all is matter and overlook that, neat as their explanations of evolution may be, they still do not rule out additional factors that might be at work, that might be merely using such things as evolution. They are, today, the "official" philosophies and are even taught in schools. They have their won zealots who attack the beliefs and religions of others: the result can be intolerance and contention.

If all the brightest minds since the fifth century B.C. or before have never been able to agree on the subject of religion or antireligion, it is an arena of combat between people that one would do well to say out of.

In this sea of contention, one bright principle has emerged: the right to believe as one chooses.

"Faith" and "belief" do not necessarily surrender to logic: they cannot even be declared to be illogical. They can be things quite apart.

Any advice one might give another on this subject is safest when it simply asserts the right to believe as one chooses. One is at liberty to hold up his own beliefs for acceptance. One is at risk when he seeks to assault the beliefs of others, much more so when he attacks and seeks to harm others because of their religious convictions.

Man, since the dawn of the species, has taken great consolation and joy in his religions. Even the "mechanist" and "materialist" of today sound much like the priests of old as they spread their dogma.

Men without faith are a pretty sorry lot. They can even be given something to have faith in. But when they have religious beliefs, respect them.

The way to happiness can become contentious when one fails to respect the religious beliefs of others.

For a full view of what "The Way to Happiness" is all about visit the site at http://wwwthewaytohappiness.org.


And now for the truth

What the Scientology organization is trying to do here is pretend that they're a religion some how and assert that their criminal frauds and swindles should be respected because they're some how religious. In fact, the Scientology organization tried to argue before a number of judges in Clearwater, Florida that they had the right to kill one of their own followers named Lisa McPherson based upon the provisions of the &quoit;Religious Freedom Restoration Act." Indeed, Scientology has a long history of claiming relgious persecution when they're hauled up in front of a judge or otherwise banned for their endless homicides, frauds, and swindles.

People have the right to believe what they will -- whether it's religion or otherwise -- however they have other rights, rights which protect them from criminal acts and frauds. One such right is the right to know what they're purchasing before they buy it and not get taken in by a lot of lies in the promotion of the product they're buying. The Scientology organization does not tell their victims what it is they're going to be buying and what it is Scientology is really all about. If the Scientology organization told their prospective victims about Lord Xenu, invisible murdered space aliens called "Body Thetans," and all the rest of what Scientology really believes, few -- if anybody -- would buy Scientology.

Scientology not only keeps the facts behind what they really believe a secret from their followers (until years later after the victims has become brainwashed and broke) but Scientology also doesn't tell their followers what they're going to be ordered to believe about real religions.

As an example, Scientology's mad messiah L. Ron Hubbard claimed that religion is an "implant" -- literally a video movie shown to people before they're born to implant lies into them to keep them enslaved while they're alive. Scientology's messiah not only has his followers believe that religion is an enslavement device, he also claimed that Christianity and Jesus Christ was an implant -- something created, he claimed, when a madman discovered something Hubbard called "R6." At the same time, Scientology lies and claims that they are some how compatable with all real religions.

Do real religions lie to their followers about what they believe? Scientology does. It has to in order to sucker followers in to their Ponzi-like bait-and-switch bunko scam.

Horribly, Scientology doesn't respect followers of their own "technology." People who employ Scientology's written rituals and procedures yet don't give money to the criminal organization are known as Free Zoners and Scientology refuses to allow them to use L. Ron Hubbard's "scriptures" freely as part of their "religion." Since by all outward appearances Scientology seems to be nothing but a financial swindle, Scientology won't respect Free Zoner's rights or beliefs and won't allow them to freely disseminate and grow their religion/technology.

Real religions want people to freely disseminate their scriptures, technology, rituals, and ideologies. Scientology, to contrast, has violently stomped on Scientologists and Free Zoners who have publically shared the deeply held written "religious technologies" of Scientology. They want what they believe to be hidden not only from the outside world but from their own followers who have not paid in those big bucks for the dubious privelage of finally finding out what they're supposed to believe.

If pressed, I might consider the possibility that people have the right to believe in something that kills them -- provided it's an adult who is sound of mind and is someone who knows what they're doing. Sadly, Scientology has killed a number of their own followers -- like Lisa McPherson who begged, screamed, and tried to fight her way out of Scientology and yet died knowing her "friends" had to kill her to "save" her.

Nobody has to respect the "religious beliefs" of others when such "beliefs" are criminal acts. In Scientology's case, judges have consistantly ruled over and over again that Scientology does not have the religious right to break the law. As one Judge put it, the First Ammendment doesn't grant everyone immunity from prosecution otherwise every man would be a law unto himself.

---

The views and opinions stated within this web page are those of the author or authors which wrote them and may not reflect the views and opinions of the ISP or account user which hosts the web page. The opinions may or may not be those of the Chairman of The Skeptic Tank.

The name "Scientology"® is trademarked to the "Church" of Scientology. Neither this web page, nor this web site, nor any of the individuals mentioned herein assisting to educate the public about the Scientology organization's "Volunteer Minister" program are members of or representatives of the Scientology organization. Quotes used within this web page and within this web site are used according to the Fair Use laws of the United States.

If you find anything inaccurate or otherwise mistaken on this web page, please send a correction to COSVM at the e-mail address offered below -- with our thanks.


Back to the start of the Volunteer Minister web site

COSVM Web Site